Join the 40 Days Ruzu Campaign

76% of Nigeria’s Internet traffic happens on Mobile, the highest in the world. This means if we are not strong on mobile advertising, we are missing out big.

Everyday, someone new excitedly leaves computer village with a new android phone and joins the growing community of mobile Internet users. He gets engaged using platforms such as Whatsapp, Facebook, BBM, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter and the likes.
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Curing Diabetes or High Blood Pressure!

If you are reading this, its either of three things, 1) you have someone close to you that is/was afflicted. 2) You are afflicted, 3) You don’t want to be afflicted hence looking for a way.

Statistics reveal that the population of Nigeria is divided into this categories;

Diabetes – 6 million

High Blood Pressure – 56 million

Poor – 100 million

I lost my Dad to stroke orchestrated by high blood pressure in 2005, and since then, it has piqued my interest and made me realize, how fickle and nonchalant we can be when it comes to our health.
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WHO declares Ebola outbreak an international public health emergency

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “WHO declares Ebola outbreak an international public health emergency” was written by Maev Kennedy, for The Guardian on Friday 8th August 2014 10.15 UTC

The World Health Organisation has declared the Ebola outbreak an international public health emergency, but it is not recommending general bans on travel or trade.

The global body said the Ebola outbreak – the largest and longest in history – was happening in countries without the resources to manage the infections, some with devastated healthcare systems still recovering from war, and called on the international community to help.

“Countries affected to date simply do not have the capacity to manage an outbreak of this size and complexity on their own,” said Margaret Chan, the WHO’s director general. “I urge the international community to provide this support on the most urgent basis possible.”

The current outbreak began in Guinea in March and has spread to Sierra Leone and Liberia, with some cases in Nigeria. There is no licensed treatment or vaccine for Ebola and the death rate has been about 50%.

The virus has an incubation period of up to 21 days, meaning symptoms do not necessarily show before then.

The WHO emergency committee unanimously agreed, after two days of meetings in Geneva and teleconferences with representatives in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria, that the outbreak was “an extraordinary event”, meeting all the conditions for a public health emergency, Chan said.

With 1,711 confirmed and suspected cases, and 932 deaths, the WHO said the outbreak was a public health risk to other states – particularly in view of “fragile health care systems” in the affected countries.

Although the WHO said that “there should be no general ban on international travel or trade,” it issued a long list of recommendations on travel and contacts, including urging that all travellers leaving the countries affected by the outbreak should be screened for fever, and that no corpses should be transported across borders.

It said other states should provide information to people travelling to affected and at risk areas, be prepared to detect, investigate and manage Ebola cases, and be prepared for the evacuation and repatriation of nationals, including health workers.

States should also ensure access to specialist diagnostic laboratories, and prepare to manage travellers who arrive at international airports or border crossings with “unexplained febrile illness”.

“The possible consequences of further international spread are particularly serious in view of the virulence of the virus, the intensive community and health facility transmission patterns, and the weak health systems in the currently affected and most at-risk countries,” a statement said. “A coordinated international response is deemed essential to stop and reverse the international spread of Ebola.”

The charity Save the Children, which said it was scaling up its operations in the region, warned that medical services in the affected countries were already overwhelmed. Rob MacGillivray, its regional humanitarian director, said that even before the outbreak there was less than one doctor for every 33,000 people in Sierra Leone and Liberia.

“Parents are understandably frightened and stay away from medical centres through fear of coming into contact with the infection. Pregnant mothers are giving birth at home rather than seeking skilled help and orphaned children are at risk of being ostracised from their communities at the most vulnerable time in their lives.

“Challenges remain in reaching families in rural communities who were struggling to access healthcare even before the outbreak.”

The WHO said health advice at airports and ports or border crossings should warn travellers that though the disease is rare, careful hygiene should be practised, and all contact with blood and body fluids of infected people or animals, or with any items that have come in contact with such blood or body fluids, must be avoided.

It also says that sexual intercourse with a sick person or one recovering from Ebola should be avoided “for at least seven weeks”.

The WHO advises that the risk to travellers from sharing a flight with somebody who is showing symptoms of Ebola is “very low” – but does recommend contacting fellow travellers if a sufferer reports their condition and seeks medical help on arrival.

For those travelling to affected areas, the WHO describes the risk of business travellers or tourists returning with the virus as “extremely low” – even, it says, “if the visit included travel to the local areas from which primary cases have been reported”.

“Transmission requires direct contact with blood, secretions, organs or other body fluids of infected living or dead persons or animals, all unlikely exposures for the average traveller. Tourists are in any event advised to avoid all such contacts.”

It said the risk to travellers visiting friends and relatives in affected countries was similarly low “unless the traveller has direct physical contact with a sick or dead person or animal infected with Ebola virus”.

The long list of advice to affected states includes screening all travellers leaving for fever, banning the remains of those who have died of Ebola from being transported across borders, and ensuring “funerals and burials are conducted by well-trained personnel”.

Countries with land borders with the affected states are urged “urgently to establish surveillance for clusters of unexplained fever or deaths due to febrile illness”, and to act within 24 hours of any suspected cases.

The United States is sending teams of experts to Liberia, including 12 specialists from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, after the Liberian president, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, declared a 90-day state of emergency and said the disease had overwhelmed her country’s healthcare system.

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2010

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Ebola outbreak precautions – in pictures

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Ebola outbreak precautions – in pictures” was written by , for theguardian.com on Thursday 7th August 2014 14.04 UTC

Paramedics wearing protective suits move Miguel Pajares, a Spanish missionary infected with Ebola, on a special isolation stretcher, at Carlos III hospital, in Madrid, Spain
Paramedics wearing protective suits move Miguel Pajares, a Spanish missionary infected with Ebola, on a special isolation stretcher in Madrid. Photograph: Emilio Naranjo/EPA
Protective clothing and facilities in place at the Royal Free hospital in north London, in preparation for a patient testing positive for the Ebola virus.
Protective clothing and facilities at the Royal Free Hospital in north London. Photograph: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images
A nurse wears protective clothing to demonstrate the facilities at the Royal Free Hospital. The specialised unit allows a team of doctors and nurses to provide care for anyone with the contagious condition.
A nurse wears protective clothing to demonstrate the facilities at the Royal Free hospital. Photograph: Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images
A South Korean quarantine officer checks a thermal camera monitoring the body temperature of passengers arriving from overseas at the Incheon International Airport in Incheon, South Korea.
A South Korean quarantine officer checks a thermal camera monitoring the body temperature of passengers arriving from overseas at the Incheon international airport. Photograph: Shin Jun-hee/AP
A health official uses a thermometer on a man in the arrivals hall at the Murtala Muhammed International Airport in Lagos, Nigeria.
A Nigerian health official uses a thermometer on a man in the arrivals hall at the Murtala Muhammed international airport in Lagos. Photograph: Sunday Alamba/AP
An ambulance convoy transporting Miguel Pajares, leaves the Torrejon de Ardoz military air base of , near Madrid, Spain
An ambulance convoy transports Miguel Pajares from the Torrejon military air base near Madrid. Photograph: Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP
The interior of a Spanish Air Force Airbus A310  equipped with medical and security measures, before it departed for Liberia, to repatriate Spanish priest Miguel Pajares, who is infected with the ebola virus.
A Spanish Air Force Airbus A310 was equipped with medical and biosecurity measures before it left for Liberia to collect Miguel Pajares. Photograph: EPA
A Liberian nurse in protective clothing is sprayed with disinfectant after preparing bodies of victims of Ebola for burial in the isolation unit of the ELWA Hospital in Monrovia, Liberia.
A Liberian nurse in protective clothing is sprayed with disinfectant after preparing bodies of victims of Ebola for burial in Monrovia. Photograph: Ahmed Jallanzo/EPA
Steve Monroe, deputy director of the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases points at a map in the Emergency Operations Center in Atlanta.
Steve Monroe, the deputy director of the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases points at a map in the emergency operations centre in Atlanta. Photograph: David Goldman/AP
Children are encouraged to wash their hands in Monrovia, Liberia.
Liberian children are encouraged to wash their hands in Monrovia. Photograph: Ahmed Jallanzo/EPA
Doctors communicate using headsets under their ventilated plastic suits at the Frankfurt Main university hospital in Germany, during a simulation exercise for a possible Ebola infection, or other highly contagious illnesses.
Doctors communicate using headsets under their ventilated plastic suits at the Frankfurt Main university hospital in Germany. Photograph: Boris Roessler/EPA
A man has his temperature taken before entering offices in Monrovia, Liberia.
A Liberian man has his temperature taken before entering offices in Monrovia. Photograph: Ahmed Jallanzo/EPA
Military police are deployed at the burial site for victims of the Ebola virus in Johnsonville outside Monrovia, Liberia.
Liberian military police are deployed at a burial site for Ebola victims near Monrovia. Photograph: Ahmed Jallanzo/EPA
Nancy Writebol, an American aid worker, arrives at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.
Nancy Writebol, a US aid worker, arrives at Emory university hospital in Atlanta. Photograph: Sipa USA/REX
A nurse with a spray disinfectant at the ELWA Hospital where a US doctor Kent Bradley contracted the Ebola virus in Monrovia, Liberia.
A Liberian nurse with a disinfectant spray at the ELWA hospital in Monrovia, where the US doctor Kent Bradley contracted the Ebola virus. Photograph: Ahmed Jallanzo/EPA

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2010

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Value for Health

Atimes i wonder if we value our lives at all. I wonder why we go to extremes to get what we want at the expense of our lives!

What actually led to this? I was on my way to work today and along the Abeokuta-Lagos expressway at Mangoro bus/stop was an ugly spectacle. Right in the middle of the road, in the thick of the traffic were about 4 people with an invalid (in a wheelchair? ) soliciting for alms!

This won’t be the first time i will be seeing such spectacle, along the Falomo Bridge in Ikoyi, they abound there in about three spots. And they display the diseased parts of the invalid to members of the public all for the sake of eliciting sympathy!(or revulsion!) To add a comic twist to it, they play a monophonic tune mostly a Christmas tune to draw attention!

In as much as i want to sympathize with this group of people, i don’t subscribe to exposing members of  the public to unnecessary health risks even though our environment is so porous!And they themselves to high risks of infections.

What i want to submit this morning is that, the necessary authorities need to move to curb this ugly menace, and the civil society should also rise up to stop this unpalatable trend. I want to urge the Lagos State government to implement the Law which forbids such wanton begging/alms solicitation in public and to sensitize diseased,invalid people and the general public about the free health care program been offered by the state.

Its time to create a clean healthy environment for ourselves and for our future.